Tous les articles et traductions

, by Al jazeera

Inception: Dreams of revolution

by Larbi Sadiki

The idea of democratisation planted in Egyptian minds is beyond containment, yet Mubarak continues to resist.
The realist terminology of the ’domino effect’ does not capture the agency that Arabs are today assuming to unseat Arab hegemons, from Cairo to Sana’a.
This agency is unshackling itself (...)

A doctor to defend

By Minnie Vaid, edited by Rajpal and Sons, 5.5 euros

A chilling story of justice denied…
Binayak Sen graduated from one of India’s elite institutions, the Christian Medical College, Vellore, and chose to practice medicine amongst the tribals of Chattisgarh. Years of dedicated work led him to believe that sustainable health care cannot be achieved (...)

, by Frontline

In the name of God

The Governor of Punjab province becomes the most high-profile victim of the country’s blasphemy laws. The killing of Taseer, purportedly for describing the blasphemy laws as “black law”, the frequent suggestions that he invited death upon himself by doing this, and the lionisation of Qadri are (...)

, by Frontline

Resisting indignity

Safai karmacharis (manual scavengers) are set to end their two-decade-long movement for a life of dignity on a victorious note. As revellers across the world prepare to celebrate the end of the first decade of the new millennium and the start of a new year, a million women across India will be (...)

, by Frontline

Sabarmati’s sorrow

The multi-crore Sabarmati Riverfront Development Project in Ahmedabad suffers from serious flaws.

“WE are only ‘pinching’ the Sabarmati over a 10-kilometre stretch as it passes through the centre of Ahmedabad,” explains Bimal Patel, consultant to the Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation (AMC), which has conceived and initiated the controversial Sabarmati Riverfront Development Project. “We wouldn’t (...)

, by Outlook India

Navigators Of Change

As government, corporates seek to engage with NGOs, they gain new significance

The jholawala is the latest lobbyist in town. He or she has top policymakers on speed-dial, is now feted by the media and sought out by companies eager to promote ‘India Inclusive’. It’s a remarkable, even heady, transformation. For long derided as irrelevant trouble-making activists largely (...)

, by Tehelka

The Kashmir Valley’s media is being throttled.

Giving rumours a free run of the conflict zone

The feeling on the ground is that there is a method to this madness — the cops have orders to curb Kashmiri journalists, whether they are from the local press or national. And given that the local administration seems to be clueless, most people are convinced that this is being done at Delhi’s (...)

, by Tehelka

Wayanad tribals are soft targets for sterilisation

Kerala is the top-ranked state in terms of meeting the objectives of the national family welfare programme that dates back to 1951. But it smacks of discrimination if the state manages to achieve this status by sterilising the most vulnerable and marginalised people regardless of their other (...)

, by Tomdispatch.com

American policy on the brink

Juan Cole

The problem: Washington’s foreign-policy planners seem to be out of ideas, literally brain-dead, just as the world is visibly in flux. In their reactions, even in their rhetoric, there is remarkably little new under the sun, though from Tunisia to India, China to Brazil, our world is changing (...)

, by Ma’an News Agency

Al-Jazeera becomes focus of leaked documents debate

Conspiracy, a case of bad timing and a dis-service to the Palestinian people were some of the immediate reactions by Palestinian critics and media professionals, as Qatar-based satellite channel Al-Jazeera continued to release documents from over a decade of mediation efforts with Israel. (...)

Sponge iron’s dirty growth

Sugandh Juneja

In the years to come, India’s expanding steel production will be largely driven by sponge iron. But its manufacturing process, based on coal, is highly polluting. The repercussions are already visible near sponge iron factories which have mushroomed in iron ore- and coal-rich areas. People are (...)

, by IPS

Forgotten Promises Leave Indigenous Peoples Poorer and Hungrier

By Danilo Valladares

Dec 12, 2010 (IPS) - Nearly three years into President Álvaro Colom’s four-year term, Guatemala’s indigenous people have seen little improvement in their lives — and they represent approximately half the country’s population.
"The situation of the native peoples may be even worse than before. (...)

, by TNI

Political Dynamics of Land-grabbing in Southeast Asia: Understanding Europe’s Role

Jun Borras and Jennifer Franco - January 2011

The European Union is a significant player in the widespread occurrence of land-grabbing in Southeast Asia; both through its corporate sector and public policies.
Summary
Land-grabbing is occurring at a significant extent and pace in Southeast Asia; some of the characteristics of this land (...)

, by SACSIS

Co-operatives for development

By Glenn Ashton

Few South Africans realise the power of Co-operatives in the global economy. Canada, Norway, Italy, India, China and Brazil each have a significant amount of their GDP generated by Co-operative organisations. One in four citizens in the USA and Germany are members of Co-ops. Even though our (...)

, by CETRI

Is China greening Africa?

By Stephen Marks

One telling example was the recent Chinese government-sponsored ‘top Chinese enterprises in Africa’ competition, won by China Road and Bridge Corporation [CRBC]. The aim of the award was officially stated as being ‘to commend the contributions by Chinese enterprises in Africa’ and ‘reply to (...)

, by SACSIS

The new growth path and the three elephants in the room

By Saliem Fakir

Old political-economy problems always nibble at the feet of new aspirant runners. These problems are systemic and get carried from one era to another despite the changing face of political players.
In the last 15 years, South Africa rode the economic wave on the basis of a commodity boom, (...)