Tous les articles et traductions

, by IIED

Climate change: governments should support migration, not fear it

Governments risk adopting policies that increase people’s vulnerability to climate change because of a general prejudice against migration, according to research published today by the International Institute for Environment and Development.
The research, which includes case studies from (...)

, by ALAI

Facebook and Twitter are not a game

By Abdeslam Baraka

Facebook is not a game. It is a means of communication that transcends borders, but does not supplant national or international legality concerning civil liberties and rights of association and expression. Choosing such means to spread one’s message, is and will be useful and effective, if the (...)

, by WALLERSTEIN Immanuel

The World Social Forum, Egypt, and Transformation

The World Social Forum (WSF) is alive and well. It just met in Dakar, Senegal from Feb. 6-11. By unforeseen coincidence, this was the week of the Egyptian people’s successful dethroning of Hosni Mubarak, which finally succeeded just as the WSF was in its closing session. The WSF spent the week (...)

, by Down to earth

Kerala gets cautious

By Savvy Soumya Misra

Plans to ban extremely and moderately hazardous pesticides in cardamom district, Idukki.
Endosulfan poisoning in Kasaragod district has made the Kerala government cautious in its approach to use of pesticides. Agriculture minister M Retnakaran recently announced that the ban on extremely and (...)

Ending the crisis of capitalism or ending capitalism?

Samir Amin, November 2010, £16.95

With his usual verve and sharpness Samir Amin examines the factors that brought about the 2008 financial collapse and explores the systemic crisis of capitalism after two decades of neoliberal globalisation. He lays bare the relationship between dominating oligopolies and the globalisation of (...)

, by Electronic Intifada

Egypt’s revolution and Israel: "Bad for the Jews"

Ilan Pappe

The view from Israel is that if they indeed succeed, the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions are bad, very bad. Educated Arabs — not all of them dressed as "Islamists," quite a few of them speaking perfect English whose wish for democracy is articulated without resorting to "anti-Western" rhetoric (...)

, by IPS

Dams Threaten Aboriginal Tribe

By K. S. Harikrishnan

Over the years, the Kadars, a dwindling aboriginal tribe who live on the borders of the southern Indian states of Kerala and Tamil Nadu, have survived pestilences, extreme exploitation and even mass sterilisations. But a new government plan to build a hydroelectric dam across the Chalakudy (...)

, by SACSIS

First people still come second

By Glenn Ashton

Namibia, Namaqualand and the Namib Desert are all named after the first people who lived in that area, the Nama. Where are the Nama today? The reality is that they have largely become forgotten bit players in a complex world.
The indigenous people of various nations, descended from traditional (...)

, by IPS

Creation of native reserves slowed down under Lula

By Fabíola Ortiz

In Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s eight years as president of Brazil, he signed decrees creating just 88 indigenous reserves, far fewer than his immediate predecessors. That figure comes from the governmental National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) and the Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI), which (...)

, by The New Economics Foundation (nef)

The Great Transition

Creating a new kind of economy is crucial if we want to tackle climate change and avoid the mounting social problems associated with the rise of economic inequality. The Great Transition provides the first comprehensive blueprint for building an economy based on stability, sustainability and (...)

, by FIAN

Alarming pesticide poisoning among flower workers

Shortly before Valentine’s Day, the European campaign “Fair Flowers - for Human Rights” presents a study on the health impacts of pesticides in the Ugandan flower production for the export to Europe. The study was conducted by the campaign’s partner, the Uganda Workers’ Education Association (UWEA). (...)

, by Al Masry al youm

Women revolutionaries hope for greater say in post-Mubarak Egypt

In the days following the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians have begun to outline the characteristics of their ideal country. The “New Egypt” will be clean, it will lack discrimination, it will be corruption-free. The initiative is the beginning of a push for specific demands that were (...)

, by Les Amis de la Terre

Jatropha: money doesn’t grow on trees

Ten reasons why jatropha is neither a profitable nor sustainable investment

Jatropha is still being touted as a biofuel wonder crop. But there is evidence that jatropha does not deliver on its promises. This new report lists ten reasons why jatropha is neither a profitable nor a sustainable investment. Read more
– Download the full report (...)

, by CETRI

What next for Egypt?

by Lakhdar Ghettas

If there was ever a better time to read ‘Egypt: The Moment of Change’, a book edited by Rabab El Mahdi and Philip Marfleet which was launched in front of a packed audience at SOAS in 2009, then it is now. Made up of chapters by eight Egyptian and British academics, it catalogues the explosive (...)

Peoples Movement Assembly on Palestine

Dakar, Senegal, February 10, 2011

In Dakar, Senegal the Peoples ‘ movement Assembly on Palestine convenes at the World Social Forum (WSF) at a time of intense popular struggle in Palestine against Israeli apartheid, colonization and occupation, and for full implementation of the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people. For (...)

, by Frontline

Terrorism: Swami’s confession

Swami Aseemanand’s confessions on the involvement of Hindutva outfits in terror attacks leave investigating agencies red-faced. Whatever the final verdict on the reported confessions made recently by Swami Aseemanand, leader of Abhinav Bharat, a Hindutva extremist organisation, the fact is that (...)

, by Frontline

Miracle workers

Mirakle Couriers is the only privately run, for-profit organisation in India that employs only hearing-impaired people. The company hires such young men and women from the underprivileged sections, trains them and puts them on a career path. The company is run like any other – salaries are (...)

, by The Hindu

Retooling laws for justice

Many Indian laws do not reflect modern and enlightened concepts of justice and require major revision. The judiciary needs to reconsider laws, which conflict with fundamental rights guaranteed in the Constitution. The legislatures should fashion enlightened statutes for the 21st century. India (...)

, by Al jazeera

The shaping of a New World Order

By Mark LeVine

If the revolutions of 2011 succeed, they will force the creation of a very different regional and world system.
I remember the images well, even though I was too young to understand their political significance. But they were visceral, those photos in the New York Times from Tehran in the (...)

, by Ethical Corporation

Wikileaks - Could big business be next?

by Rajesh Chhabara

Unethical companies could be the next target of Wikileaks
While powerful governments have scrambled to control or limit the damage caused by the release of secret communications, it may be only a matter of time before confidential information about large companies finds its way to Wikileaks, (...)