Tous les articles et traductions

, by Tehelka

The making of Osama bin Laden

It had to happen. Osama bin Laden had been the target of the longest, most intense manhunt in history. Never before had the most powerful nation in the world concentrated so much of its time, energy and resources to hunt down one man. And never before had the hunters been able to deploy the (...)

, by IPS

Responsible travel means not "haggling over wooden beads"

By Hilaire Avril

Tourism as a concern found its way onto the agenda of the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro because of its potential for development but also due to its adverse effects on some populations and natural resources, particularly in Africa.
Sustainable tourism was defined at the summit as tourism (...)

, by IPS

Theatre as HIV Prevention Tool in Native Communities

By Danilo Valladares

Poverty, lack of access to education and taboos about sexuality have hampered campaigns for the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS among indigenous communities in Guatemala. These constraints have led to the development of new ways of communicating vital information, like theatre.
"We put on a (...)

, by Indian Country Today

Indian Media is a Sovereign Right

By Joseph Orozco

Thanks to the budget-cutting fervor sweeping Capitol Hill, the Public Telecommunication Facilities Program could be zeroed out this year. The PTFP funds 75% of the construction of new stations; more than 30 new Native radio licensees were expecting PTFP public radio funds in the next two years. (...)

, by TNI

The Law of Mother Earth: Behind Bolivia’s historic bill

By Nick Buxton

Approval of Bolivia’s revolutionary ’Mother Earth’ law is an historic step by social movements in a long struggle for real ecological transformation of their economy and society.
Approval of Bolivia’s revolutionary ’Mother Earth’ law is an historic step by social movements in a long struggle for (...)

, by Tehelka

India begins long fight to protect its patents

Union government has presented evidence worldwide that it owned knowledge in 600+ cases. The Indian government is now collaborating with the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), a specialised agency at the United Nations (UN), to protect its traditional knowledge.
The next time (...)

, by The Hindu

Chhattisgarh villages torched in police rampage

The operation began in the early hours of March 11 when about 350 heavily armed troopers marched into the forests of Dantewada. They returned to their barracks five days later, with three villages aflame, about 300 homes and granaries incinerated, three villagers and three soldiers dead, and (...)

, by Frontline

Sangh Parivar and new contradictions

Interview with French social scientist Christophe Jaffrelot

CHRISTOPHE JAFFRELOT, who is a Senior Research Fellow with the Centre d’Etudes et de Recherches Internationales (Centre for International Studies and Research) in Paris, has had a 25-year-long association with India. He offers courses in the modern history of India and the polity of South Asia (...)

Post-War Reconstruction in Sri Lanka. Prospects and Challenges

By D Herath, K Höglund, Prof. M Schulz, and Prof. K Tudor Silva, ICES, Colombo, 272+xvii pp

The International Centre for Ethnic Studies (ICES) launched its latest publication on Post War Reconstruction: Prospects and Challenges on the 16th of December 2010. This is one of the first books published locally or international on Reconstruction in Sri Lanka. This volume is edited by Dr. (...)

, by IPS

Native Women Seek Justice at U.N.

The United States is facing international scrutiny for its apparent failure to prosecute criminals who enter indigenous territories to prey on Native women and girls.
Between 60 and 80 percent of violent victimisation of Native American women is perpetrated by non-Natives, says a U.N. expert (...)

, by Indigenous Environmental Network

Royal society report on tar sands ignores traditional knowledge

Indigenous Peoples, Community Members and Allies raise concerns.

The Royal Society of Canada report on the tar sands released today, spurred concern by directly impacted communities and allies today as conclusions were put forward around the impacts of tar sands development within the region.
“With data coming from primarily government and industry sources, (...)

, by The Hindu

Barefoot: Promises to keep

By Harsh Mander

Even four years after the Sachar Committee Report revealed that Muslims were one of the most economically backward and socially disadvantaged communities, nothing much has been done to address the development deficits of this community. Read (...)

, by Electronic Intifada

Egypt’s revolution and Israel: "Bad for the Jews"

Ilan Pappe

The view from Israel is that if they indeed succeed, the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions are bad, very bad. Educated Arabs — not all of them dressed as "Islamists," quite a few of them speaking perfect English whose wish for democracy is articulated without resorting to "anti-Western" rhetoric (...)

, by IPS

Dams Threaten Aboriginal Tribe

By K. S. Harikrishnan

Over the years, the Kadars, a dwindling aboriginal tribe who live on the borders of the southern Indian states of Kerala and Tamil Nadu, have survived pestilences, extreme exploitation and even mass sterilisations. But a new government plan to build a hydroelectric dam across the Chalakudy (...)

, by SACSIS

First people still come second

By Glenn Ashton

Namibia, Namaqualand and the Namib Desert are all named after the first people who lived in that area, the Nama. Where are the Nama today? The reality is that they have largely become forgotten bit players in a complex world.
The indigenous people of various nations, descended from traditional (...)

, by IPS

Creation of native reserves slowed down under Lula

By Fabíola Ortiz

In Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s eight years as president of Brazil, he signed decrees creating just 88 indigenous reserves, far fewer than his immediate predecessors. That figure comes from the governmental National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) and the Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI), which (...)

, by Frontline

Terrorism: Swami’s confession

Swami Aseemanand’s confessions on the involvement of Hindutva outfits in terror attacks leave investigating agencies red-faced. Whatever the final verdict on the reported confessions made recently by Swami Aseemanand, leader of Abhinav Bharat, a Hindutva extremist organisation, the fact is that (...)

, by Frontline

In the name of God

The Governor of Punjab province becomes the most high-profile victim of the country’s blasphemy laws. The killing of Taseer, purportedly for describing the blasphemy laws as “black law”, the frequent suggestions that he invited death upon himself by doing this, and the lionisation of Qadri are (...)

, by Tehelka

Wayanad tribals are soft targets for sterilisation

Kerala is the top-ranked state in terms of meeting the objectives of the national family welfare programme that dates back to 1951. But it smacks of discrimination if the state manages to achieve this status by sterilising the most vulnerable and marginalised people regardless of their other (...)

, by IPS

Forgotten Promises Leave Indigenous Peoples Poorer and Hungrier

By Danilo Valladares

Dec 12, 2010 (IPS) - Nearly three years into President Álvaro Colom’s four-year term, Guatemala’s indigenous people have seen little improvement in their lives — and they represent approximately half the country’s population.
"The situation of the native peoples may be even worse than before. (...)