Tous les articles et traductions

, by Oxfam International

Blind Optimism

Challenging the myths about private health care in poor countries

The realisation of the right to health for millions of people in poor countries depends upon a massive increase in health services to achieve universal and equitable access. A growing number of international donors are promoting an expansion of private-sector health-care delivery to fulfil this (...)

, by TNI

Changing the flow Water movements in Latin America

Beverly Bell, Jeff Conant, Marcela Olivera, Crossley Pinkstaff, Philipp Terhorst. March 2009

In case after case around the world, water has been turned into a profit-making commodity – preventing people access to the most essential element on Earth. Private ownership of water and water delivery systems has severely compounded the abuse, neglect, mismanagement and exploitation of water (...)

, by Infochange

Lives sacrificed: Women and health in South Asia

By Deepti Priya Mehrotra

A new World Bank report looks at the state of reproductive health of poor women in five countries — Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka — and makes a case for decentralised planning, delivery and expansion of health services, with a clear focus on enhancing inclusion
‘Sparing Lives: (...)

, by BARRY Tom

Texas-New Mexico Border Series

Americas Policy Program

Dee Torres sees history in the making in the West Texas borderlands. The elementary school teacher wants to be part of the history of the borderlands, and wants her grandchildren to remember these times.
Torres, a resident since a child of the border town of Ft. Hancock, is taking photos of (...)

, by Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations (SOMO)

Playing with labour rights: Music player and game console manufacturing in China

MakeITfair, FinnWatch, SACOM and SOMO - March 2009

makeITfair’s new report Playing with Labour Rights tells that hiring workers through labour agencies is increasingly common in the electronics industry. In China, the number of contract workers increased by seven million to 27 million in 2008. The studied factories made no exception. "The sales (...)

, by Choike

Iraq: the war and occupation

On 1 May 2003, 20 days after Baghdad was taken in an offensive by the allied troops of the United States and Great Britain, with the support of the Spanish Government headed by José María Aznar, US President George W Bush proclaimed the “end to hostilities” in Iraqi territory. However, the truth (...)

How Many Divisions?

Uri AVNERY

Nearly seventy years ago, in the course of World War II, a heinous crime was committed in the city of Leningrad. For more than a thousand days, a gang of extremists called “the Red Army” held the millions of the town’s inhabitants hostage and provoked retaliation from the German Wehrmacht from (...)

, by Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations (SOMO)

The Dark Side of Cyberspace: Inside the sweatshops of China’s Computer Hardware Production

Jenny Chan, Charles Ho, SOMO, Weed (World Economy, Ecology & Development), Procure IT Fair, December 2008

China is currently the world’s largest producer of electronic products. As in other developing economies, the transformation in electronics has been characterized by rapid upgrading from lowcost consumer goods to higher-technology items. Today, information technology (IT) is predominant – for (...)

, by Association for Progressive Communications (APC)

Cultivating Violence through Technology? Exploring the Connections Between Information Communication Technologies and Violence Against Women

Jac sm Kee, APC WNSP (Women’s networking support programme), 2005

In recent years, information communication technologies (ICTs) and violence against women (VAW) have become intricately entwined. This paper examines how ’new ICTs’ - digital technologies like the internet, multimedia and wireless phones - facilitate or enable a culture of VAW in the areas of (...)

, by The African Feminist Forum

Fundamentalism And Women’s Rights in Africa

A paper presented at the 2006 African Feminist Forum

The essential paradox about a globalised world is that as global business and micro politics have relentlessly spread across the globe, there has been a tendency for many people to get closer to the ethnic, national, religious and racial identities. This nestling within a known identity has (...)

, by OneWorld

UN says women must promote peace and security

Peacekeepers must ensure security for women in post-conflict situations. Gender issues needed special focus, especially when sexual violence was routinely used as a tactic of war, said a top UN official during a Security Council meeting.
A comprehensive and sustainable peace is not possible in (...)

, by UNESCO

Education for all by 2015: will we make it?

Global Monitoring Report 2008 of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

A mid-term assessment of where the world stands on its commitment to provide basic education for all children, youth and adults by 2015.
What education policies and programmes have been successful? What are the main challenges? How much aid is needed? Is aid being properly targeted? (...)

, by Greenpeace France

Toxic Tech: Not in Our Backyard

Uncovering the Hidden Flows of e-Waste

A dangerous new waste stream is rapidly emerging.
The UN estimates that some 20 to 50m tonnes of e-waste are generated worldwide each year, comprising more than 5% of all municipal solid waste. The fate of large quantities of this so-called e-waste is unknown. This “hidden flow” is the e-waste (...)

, by FAKIR Saliem

Obama, America and the Rise of the Non-White World

SACSIS – the South African Civil Society Information Service

It would be a squint-eyed view to read in Obama’s victory just a historic moment for African-Americans in the United States of America (USA).
It should be granted that Obama’s entry through the front door of the White House rather than the back door, once reserved for black cleaners only, does (...)