Tous les articles et traductions

, by Frontline

Libya recolonised

By Aijaz AHMAD

Libya is the first country that the Euro-American consortium has invaded exclusively on the pretext of human rights violations.
FROM Kabul in October 2001 to Tripoli in October 2011, a decade of unremitting planetary warfare has seen countries devastated and capitals occupied over a vast (...)

, by Common Dreams

Bill Gates (the .001%) Joins the 99% for Robin Hood Tax

By Sarah Anderson

One of the world’s richest and many of the poorest agree on something, but the Obama administration is holding out.
The world’s second-richest man and a group of American nurses on the frontlines of the Occupy Wall Street protests came to the G20 summit in Cannes, France this week to advocate (...)

, by Infochange

Decadal journeys: Debt and despair spur urban growth

By P. Sainath

Census 2011, which reports a higher growth of urban population than rural as millions give up farming, does not record footloose migration, which drives desperate people to search for work in multiple directions with no clear destination. This is a giant drama that we have not even begun to (...)

, by Down to earth

The Secret Garden

By Sayantan Bera

Want to know about a lost variety of rice or a cure to asthma? Answers lie in the notebooks of schoolchildren and women of the Sundarbans and Madhyamgram, says Sayantan Bera.
[...]The documentation exercise “is like a class struggle in conservation,” a lucid Silanjan Bhattacharya had explained (...)

, by Frontline

Food Security: Dividing the poor

By T.K. Rajalakshmi

The flawed Bill on food security has not received the kind of publicity that the Lokpal Bill has, but that does not diminish its significance.
"THIS government has divided everything and everyone. There are different cards for different sections of the poor. If my employer, taking pity on me, (...)

, by Down to earth

No climate for Cleantech

By Latha Jishnu

Most of the clean energy innovations are with just six rich countries and hardly any technology is coming to developing nations.
What is the outlook for developing countries in getting clean energy technologies transferred to them at a reasonable fee? Will intellectual property rights (IPR) (...)

, by Down to earth

Bhutan: Pursuit of happiness

By Aditya Batra

Karma Tshiteem is the secretary of the Gross National Happiness Commission, the novel name of Bhutan’s Planning Commission. He tells Aditya Batra how the concept has fared in the new democracy:
"There can be elements of subjectivity in the GNH Policy Screening Tool. We are taking 26 variables (...)

, by Frontline

End of Emergency

By R.K. Radhakrishnana

Two years after the LTTE’s decimation, President Mahinda Rajapaksa proposes the lifting of the state of emergency in Sri Lanka.
A day before the delayed debate on Sri Lankan Tamils took off in the Indian Parliament and just over a fortnight before the 18th regular session of the United Nations (...)

, by Media Diversity Institute

US Journalism’s Lack of Focus on Wall Street

By Pedja Urosevic

They’ve been ‘occupying’ Wall Street for almost a month, but people looking for information on what it’s all about are forced to go offshore for television journalism that will explain it to them. Mainstream media coverage of the Occupy Wall Street protest in the United States has been lamentable. (...)

, by Pambazuka

Death of Gaddafi

By Horace Campbell

Gaddafi’s killing - with all the hallmarks of a ’coordinated assassination’ – marks ’one more episode ion this NATO war in Libya and North Africa’, writes Horace Campbell. The ’remilitarisation of Africa and new deployment of Africom is a new stage of African politics,’ says Campbell.
The news of the (...)

, by SACSIS

The Green Growth Agenda: Is This the New Hope?

By Saliem Fakir

It could be argued that the climate change issue has become less about climate justice and more about new profits.
In South Africa, the concept of the green economy is abuzz with nervous energy. There have been numerous conferences on the subject in light of the upcoming United Nations Climate (...)

, by SACSIS

On the Wall Street Occupation

By Richard Pithouse

In The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck’s novel about the Great Depression, Tom Joad, the novel’s central character, a man who has been made poor and who is on the run from the law, tells his mother in the climactic scene that: “I been thinking about us, too, about our people living like pigs and (...)

, by CETRI

Libya’s revolution: tribe, nation, politics

The Libyan war is often portrayed through a “tribal” lens that fails to explain how the country’s tribes coexist with a sense of nationhood.
The Libyan war has not been a tribal conflict. Yet throughout the seven months of fighting, much external commentary predicted and expected that the war (...)

, by CIP Americas Program

Militarism in Paraguay: The Other Side of the Economic Model

By Raúl Zibechi

A production model based on soy monoculture results in economic growth, but also causes social instability that can lead to political crises. The temptation is to use armed force to resolve them.
At the end of September, construction began on the World Trade Center of Asunción. The first step (...)

, by LINKS

Arab Spring Eyewitness: Reflections on the Revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia

By Ted Walker

Arriving in Egypt the day before the September 9 protests that brought tens of thousands into the street, marches to the Ministry of Interior and the Supreme Court, and then the storming of the Israeli embassy, certainly threw me in at the deep end! But arriving in Cairo at almost any point (...)

, by SACSIS

Africa Must Lead: COP 17 Must Deliver Climate Justice to Developing Nations

By Glenn Ashton

Climate change predominantly impacts those who have benefited least from fossil fuelled industrialisation. The poor have less social, economic and political capacity to adapt to climate change than the rich. The arrival of the global climate negotiating lobby on African shores must focus the (...)