Tous les articles et traductions

, by OpenDemocracy , KALDOR Mary

Reconceptualising war

What if defeating the enemy was the justification for war, but not its real goal? What if its goal was a certain kind of power-brokerage? On Opendemocracy.net, Mary Kaldor attempts a redefinition of war in line with contemporary developments:
"Clausewitz defined war as an ‘an act of violence (...)

, by Foreign Policy in Focus

Obama Boosts Nukes

Despite his pledge to seek nuclear disarmament, Obama is investing big in the nuclear complex.
On February 1, the Obama administration delivered a budget request calling for a full 10 percent increase in nuclear weapons spending next year, to be followed by further increases in subsequent (...)

, by International Crisis Group

Reforming Pakistan’s Civil Service

If Pakistan’s deteriorating civil service is not urgently repaired, public disillusionment and resentment could be used by the military to justify another spell of authoritarian rule.
Reforming Pakistan’s Civil Service, the latest report from the International Crisis Group, analyses the (...)

, by Himal Southasian

Waiting for the Jaffna train

Even as the people of Jaffna – and those who were displaced – make use of their new freedoms of movement, they are confronted with the effect of decades of political stagnation. Read more

, by IPS

Israel Declares War on Peace NGOs

One year after the devastating attack on Hamas in Gaza a new wave of reports castigating Israel for war crimes has emerged.
Now, Israel is fighting back with a report on the reports, picking on international NGOs such as Amnesty, Christian Aid, Oxfam, Trocaire , Finn Church Aid, Diakonia and (...)

, by Tomdispatch.com

The Year of the Assassin

An American World of War: What to Watch for in 2010

According to the Chinese calendar, 2010 is the Year of the Tiger. We don’t name our years, but if we did, this one might prospectively be called the Year of the Assassin.
We, of course, think of ourselves as something like the peaceable kingdom. After all, the shock of September 11, 2001 was (...)

, by Frontline

Wave of support

Tsunami relief and rehabilitation

ON December 26, 2004, giant waves lashed coastal India and left behind a trail of death and destruction. It also left behind lessons in resilience for many. The tsunami anniversary kindles memories of loss and offers, for the non-governmental organisations (NGOs) that helped the victims in (...)

, by MISHRA Pankaj, The Guardian

Kissinger’s fantasy is Obama’s reality

The road to stability runs through Kashmir. With its latest surge, America has taken a terrible diversion.
Meeting George Bush at the White House to discuss Afghanistan, the Pakistani journalist Ahmed Rashid once marvelled at how a "US president could live in such an unreal world, where the (...)

, by Pambazuka

Africa’s children are important

‘I am an angry African,’ Assefa Bequele writes in this week’s Pambazuka News, challenging the continent’s failure to meet its collective responsibilities to children. ‘I will tell you why and what, I hope, we can do to build an Africa fit for children and help nurture an African man and woman that (...)

, by CHOMSKY Noam

War, Peace and Obama’s Nobel

The hopes and prospects for peace aren’t well aligned—not even close. The task is to bring them nearer. Presumably that was the intent of the Nobel Peace Prize committee in choosing President Barack Obama.
The prize “seemed a kind of prayer and encouragement by the Nobel committee for future (...)

, by ROY Arundhati

The heart of India is under attack

The government has announced Operation Green Hunt, a war purportedly against the "Maoist" rebels headquartered in the jungles of central India. Of course, the Maoists are by no means the only ones rebelling. There is a whole spectrum of struggles all over the country that people are engaged (...)

, by IPS

South Asia: Women’s Peace Offensive

Within the South Asian region, Pakistan, India and Afghanistan have for decades been torn by internal and external conflicts that have cried out for, but have not quite found, a lasting resolution.
Aware of the repercussions of remaining silent on a host of issues, including peace and (...)

, by International Crisis Group

Guinea: Military Rule Must End

The killing of at least 160 participants in a peaceful demonstration, the rape of many women protestors, and the arrest of political leaders by security forces in Conakry on 28 September 2009 showed starkly the dangers that continued military rule poses to Guinea’s stability and to a region (...)

, by TNI

NeoConOpticon. The EU Security-Industrial Complex

Despite the often benign intent behind collaborative European ‘research’ into integrated land, air, maritime, space and cyber-surveillance systems, the EU’s security and R&D policy is coalescing around a high-tech blueprint for a new kind of security. It envisages a future world of red zones (...)

, by TNI

Neither War Nor Peace

The Future Of The Cease-Fire Agreements In Burma

This year marks the twentieth anniversary of the first cease-fire agreements in Burma, which put a stop to decades of fighting between the military government and a wide range of ethnic armed opposition groups.
These groups had taken up arms against the government in search of more autonomy (...)

, by IPS

Sri Lanka: Media Kept on Tight Leash

As the latest round of Asia’s longest-running guerrilla war winds down, scores of journalists here are experiencing intimidation and harassment for being critical of the military campaign against the separatist Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE).
The issues currently in focus are the (...)

, by Pambazuka

Aricom: Making peace or fuelling war

Daniel Volman and William Minter

In the first of a two-part article exploring the implications of the US AFRICOM (the United States Africa Command) programme, Daniel Volman and William Minter discuss the growing strategic importance of the African continent to US interests. Arguing that shaping a new US security policy will (...)