Tous les articles et traductions

Framing Muslims. Stereotyping and representation after 9/11

Peter MOREY, Amina YAQIN, Harvard Univesity Press, 256 pp, June 2011, £20.95

Can Muslims ever fully be citizens of the West? Can the values of Islam ever be brought into accord with the individual freedoms central to the civic identity of Western nations? Not if you believe what you see on TV. Whether the bearded fanatic, the veiled, oppressed female, or the shadowy (...)

, by Science and Development Network (SciDev.Net)

Gulf states need critical science journalism

By Bothina Osama and Aisling Irwin

Gulf states in the Middle East are pouring millions of dollars into a scientific renaissance — yet journalists are failing to give these initiatives any critical assessment, leading science journalists in the region have said.
Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Qatar and Saudi Arabia are all making huge (...)

SMS Uprising: mobile activism in Africa

Edited by Nigerian activist Sokari Ekine, who runs the prize-winning blog Black Looks, the book brings together some of the best known and experienced developers and users of mobile phone technologies in Africa, including Juliana Rotich from Ushahidi in Kenya, Ken Banks of Kiwanja.net, and (...)

, by IIED

New website shows how nature plus culture equals resilience

Nature and culture are deeply linked. Together they are central to the lives and livelihoods of hundreds of millions of marginalised people around the world, and will be critical to how they respond to climate change and other environmental challenges.
To shine a light on this way of thinking (...)

, by Infochange

How free are we?

From the jailing of a person for allegedly defaming an Indian historical figure online to blocking of popular adult site Savitabhabhi without granting the creators an opportunity to defend their right to free expression, there are increasing concerns over the government’s power to monitor, (...)

How To Bypass Internet Censorship

284 pages, 10 euros

Most of governements have tools and laws allowing to lead surveillance and block of the use of cybernaut. This tools are produced by great private society. They are widely used by dictatorships against there own people, to control information and to take off the most troublesome.
To fight (...)

, by Indian Country Today

Indian Media is a Sovereign Right

By Joseph Orozco

Thanks to the budget-cutting fervor sweeping Capitol Hill, the Public Telecommunication Facilities Program could be zeroed out this year. The PTFP funds 75% of the construction of new stations; more than 30 new Native radio licensees were expecting PTFP public radio funds in the next two years. (...)

, by Electronic Intifada

Israel investing $1.6 million in "new media warriors"

By Jillian Kestler-D’Amours

The Israeli military establishment is once again on the offensive, but instead of high-tech weaponry and missiles, it is using computer screens, keyboards and rapid wireless connections to fight what Israeli military representatives are dubbing a "new media war."
In early February, military (...)

, by Al jazeera

A revolution against neoliberalism?

By Walter Armbrust

On February 16th I read a comment was posted on the wall of the Kullina Khalid Saed ("We are all Khaled Said") Facebook page administered by the now very famous Wael Ghonim. By that time it had been there for about 21 hours. The comment referred to a news item reporting that European (...)

, by ALAI

Facebook and Twitter are not a game

By Abdeslam Baraka

Facebook is not a game. It is a means of communication that transcends borders, but does not supplant national or international legality concerning civil liberties and rights of association and expression. Choosing such means to spread one’s message, is and will be useful and effective, if the (...)

, by Ethical Corporation

Wikileaks - Could big business be next?

by Rajesh Chhabara

Unethical companies could be the next target of Wikileaks
While powerful governments have scrambled to control or limit the damage caused by the release of secret communications, it may be only a matter of time before confidential information about large companies finds its way to Wikileaks, (...)

, by Tehelka

The Kashmir Valley’s media is being throttled.

Giving rumours a free run of the conflict zone

The feeling on the ground is that there is a method to this madness — the cops have orders to curb Kashmiri journalists, whether they are from the local press or national. And given that the local administration seems to be clueless, most people are convinced that this is being done at Delhi’s (...)

, by Ma’an News Agency

Al-Jazeera becomes focus of leaked documents debate

Conspiracy, a case of bad timing and a dis-service to the Palestinian people were some of the immediate reactions by Palestinian critics and media professionals, as Qatar-based satellite channel Al-Jazeera continued to release documents from over a decade of mediation efforts with Israel. (...)

, by London Review of Books

Public Diplomacy 2.0

On a balmy evening in April 2009 Barham Salih, then deputy prime minister of Iraq, sat in the garden of his Baghdad villa while a young internet entrepreneur called Jack Dorsey tried to persuade him that he needed to be on Twitter. Dorsey, the founder of Twitter, was in Baghdad at the (...)

, by The Nation

WikiLeaks and Hacktivist Culture

Peter Ludlow

In recent months there has been considerable discussion about the WikiLeaks phenomenon, and understandably so, given the volume and sensitivity of the documents the website has released. What this discussion has revealed, however, is that the media and government agencies believe there is a (...)

, by Frontline

Right To Information: Martyrs to transparency

October 2010 marks the fifth anniversary of the Right to Information (RTI) Act. The Act and its implementation have been described in both administrative circles and civil society as “revolutionary” , “a blow for transparency”, “a check on corrupt practices” and “a people’s intervention tool with (...)