Tous les articles et traductions

, by India together

Nuking dissent over Jaitapur

The Nuclear Power Corporation of India (NPCIL) and the political establishment are burying their heads in the sand over the controversial nuclear plants on the Konkan coast, which will affect the lives of people in the entire region. [...] The NPCIL plans to erect six such plants, built by the (...)

, by Frontline

Green power

Germany’s policies prove that renewable sources of energy are a viable option. IN September 2010, the German Federal Environment Agency announced that by 2050 the country would be in a position to meet all of its electricity requirements from renewable energy sources as opposed to the present 16 (...)

, by Frontline

Not out of the woods yet

The promise of the Forest Rights Act remains largely unfulfilled, says a committee set up by the Ministries of Environment and Forests and Tribal Affairs. It seems hard for a government used to controlling most of India’s common lands to let go of them. Even though it has passed a law mandating (...)

, by Tehelka

Highway To hell

Ask Chennai’s (Madras’) fisherfolk and they will tell you that the road to hell is built on stilts. Various Central and state government agencies plan to construct three controversial expressways on stilts in the coastal city. These roads will displace more than 1 lakh people — mostly urban poor — (...)

, by Indigenous Environmental Network

Royal society report on tar sands ignores traditional knowledge

Indigenous Peoples, Community Members and Allies raise concerns.

The Royal Society of Canada report on the tar sands released today, spurred concern by directly impacted communities and allies today as conclusions were put forward around the impacts of tar sands development within the region.
“With data coming from primarily government and industry sources, (...)

, by Tehelka

Jaitapur nuclear plant still far from being accepted

Lock-ups, prisons and court cases have become an integral part of the lives of Jaitapur’s residents. The scenic village in Maharashtra, which is to be home to the world’s biggest nuclear plant, has virtually turned into a state of dystopia. The people of the five villages that would be affected (...)

, by Frontline

Scorching the earth

By Praful Bidwai

The Environment Ministry’s clearance of projects such as Posco, Jaitapur and Lavasa will cause havoc in our gravely endangered environment. Even the worst pessimist could not have imagined that the January 31 order of the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) approving the South (...)

, by IIED

Climate change: governments should support migration, not fear it

Governments risk adopting policies that increase people’s vulnerability to climate change because of a general prejudice against migration, according to research published today by the International Institute for Environment and Development.
The research, which includes case studies from (...)

, by Down to earth

Kerala gets cautious

By Savvy Soumya Misra

Plans to ban extremely and moderately hazardous pesticides in cardamom district, Idukki.
Endosulfan poisoning in Kasaragod district has made the Kerala government cautious in its approach to use of pesticides. Agriculture minister M Retnakaran recently announced that the ban on extremely and (...)

, by IPS

Dams Threaten Aboriginal Tribe

By K. S. Harikrishnan

Over the years, the Kadars, a dwindling aboriginal tribe who live on the borders of the southern Indian states of Kerala and Tamil Nadu, have survived pestilences, extreme exploitation and even mass sterilisations. But a new government plan to build a hydroelectric dam across the Chalakudy (...)

, by Frontline

Sabarmati’s sorrow

The multi-crore Sabarmati Riverfront Development Project in Ahmedabad suffers from serious flaws.

“WE are only ‘pinching’ the Sabarmati over a 10-kilometre stretch as it passes through the centre of Ahmedabad,” explains Bimal Patel, consultant to the Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation (AMC), which has conceived and initiated the controversial Sabarmati Riverfront Development Project. “We wouldn’t (...)

Sponge iron’s dirty growth

Sugandh Juneja

In the years to come, India’s expanding steel production will be largely driven by sponge iron. But its manufacturing process, based on coal, is highly polluting. The repercussions are already visible near sponge iron factories which have mushroomed in iron ore- and coal-rich areas. People are (...)

, by CETRI

Is China greening Africa?

By Stephen Marks

One telling example was the recent Chinese government-sponsored ‘top Chinese enterprises in Africa’ competition, won by China Road and Bridge Corporation [CRBC]. The aim of the award was officially stated as being ‘to commend the contributions by Chinese enterprises in Africa’ and ‘reply to (...)

, by NARAIN Sunita

Deal won, stakes lost

Cancum deal shifts burden on developing countries not developed

Last fortnight we discussed the clandestine endgame afoot at Cancun to change the framework of the climate change negotiations to suit big and powerful polluters.
Since then Cancun has concluded and a deal, in the form of a spate of agreements, has been gavelled into existence by the chair. (...)

, by IIED

Questions & Answers with Krystyna Swiderska on the Nagoya Protocol

Last month, after 18 years of negotiations and more than 2 weeks of tense discussions in Nagoya, Japan, the world finally struck a deal on access to genetic resources and benefit sharing. The agreement — the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and Equitable Sharing of Benefits — was, (...)

, by Infochange

Renewable energies as big business opportunities?

Biomass and biogas are the cheap, decentralised renewable energies to choose for India. But the ministry of renewable energies — and the technocrats and entrepreneurs surrounding it — appear to favour hi-tech solutions such as grid solar power, with only a few exceptions such as the project to (...)

, by The Hindu

Little hope left for right to recycle

Clambering over garbage heaps, rummaging through trash cans, 13-year-old Supriya Bhadakwad didn’t set out to save the planet, just her family. But two decades later, in the global arena of climate negotiations, she and other rag-pickers are making their voices heard, tilting with big corporate (...)

, by NARAIN Sunita

Is bamboo a tree or a grass?

The definition is contested as the answer has immense economic implications. If bamboo is a tree or timber, it belongs to the forest department and can be auctioned to the paper and pulp industry, often at throwaway rates.
If it is a grass, then it would be classified as a minor forest produce (...)