Tous les articles et traductions

, by Himal Southasian

The long shadow of authoritarianism

Is the Maldives heading towards a democratic reversal? When the recent revolutions in West Asia and North Africa raised the dissent of the governed to an unprecedented crescendo, President Mohamed Nasheed was quick to remind Maldivians of their shared political trajectory with the Egyptians. (...)

, by Frontline

Labour Issues: United action

Trade unions of all hues join forces in an unprecedented manner and present a charter of demands to the government. In a rare show of unity, and for the first time since Independence, around one lakh workers affiliated to eight central trade unions and national industrial federations, including (...)

, by The Hindu

Chhattisgarh villages torched in police rampage

The operation began in the early hours of March 11 when about 350 heavily armed troopers marched into the forests of Dantewada. They returned to their barracks five days later, with three villages aflame, about 300 homes and granaries incinerated, three villagers and three soldiers dead, and (...)

, by Frontline

Sangh Parivar and new contradictions

Interview with French social scientist Christophe Jaffrelot

CHRISTOPHE JAFFRELOT, who is a Senior Research Fellow with the Centre d’Etudes et de Recherches Internationales (Centre for International Studies and Research) in Paris, has had a 25-year-long association with India. He offers courses in the modern history of India and the polity of South Asia (...)

History of the Social Determinants of Health

By Sanjoy Bhattacharya, Harold J Cook, Anne Hardy, edited by Orient Blackswan, 2009

Every subject has its history, including the Social eterminants of Health. It is a subject that investigates differences in human health that occur because of social life, from income and class to family life and neighbourhood. Social determinants can have very large effects on longevity, just (...)

, by NARAIN Sunita

Think differently, Mr Finance Minister

As I write this piece, the finance minister has dispatched the Union Budget 2011. The press is busy reflecting the views of business and industry lobbies, as they quibble over duty exemptions, insist on financial stimulus and other incentives, and cry for big-ticket reform—foreign direct (...)

, by Frontline

Not out of the woods yet

The promise of the Forest Rights Act remains largely unfulfilled, says a committee set up by the Ministries of Environment and Forests and Tribal Affairs. It seems hard for a government used to controlling most of India’s common lands to let go of them. Even though it has passed a law mandating (...)

, by Infochange

What is left of the Left?

As long as there is a dominating status quo, marginalisation and violation of human rights, the Left has a role to play globally and in India, says John Samuel. But the new wave of left politics must go beyond party politics — to the building of a more ethically driven leadership, a non-violent (...)

, by TNI

Libya and beyond: what’s next for democracy ?

By Phillys Bennis

The Gaddafi regime in Libya seems to believe that if a government crackdown is murderous enough, demonstrations will stop.
In Egypt, the relatively short-lived military crackdown by the hated security agencies and pro-regime thugs actually strengthened the opposition, reminding the millions in (...)

, by ALAI

Facebook and Twitter are not a game

By Abdeslam Baraka

Facebook is not a game. It is a means of communication that transcends borders, but does not supplant national or international legality concerning civil liberties and rights of association and expression. Choosing such means to spread one’s message, is and will be useful and effective, if the (...)

, by SACSIS

First people still come second

By Glenn Ashton

Namibia, Namaqualand and the Namib Desert are all named after the first people who lived in that area, the Nama. Where are the Nama today? The reality is that they have largely become forgotten bit players in a complex world.
The indigenous people of various nations, descended from traditional (...)

, by The New Economics Foundation (nef)

The Great Transition

Creating a new kind of economy is crucial if we want to tackle climate change and avoid the mounting social problems associated with the rise of economic inequality. The Great Transition provides the first comprehensive blueprint for building an economy based on stability, sustainability and (...)

, by Al Masry al youm

Women revolutionaries hope for greater say in post-Mubarak Egypt

In the days following the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians have begun to outline the characteristics of their ideal country. The “New Egypt” will be clean, it will lack discrimination, it will be corruption-free. The initiative is the beginning of a push for specific demands that were (...)

, by CETRI

What next for Egypt?

by Lakhdar Ghettas

If there was ever a better time to read ‘Egypt: The Moment of Change’, a book edited by Rabab El Mahdi and Philip Marfleet which was launched in front of a packed audience at SOAS in 2009, then it is now. Made up of chapters by eight Egyptian and British academics, it catalogues the explosive (...)

, by Frontline

Terrorism: Swami’s confession

Swami Aseemanand’s confessions on the involvement of Hindutva outfits in terror attacks leave investigating agencies red-faced. Whatever the final verdict on the reported confessions made recently by Swami Aseemanand, leader of Abhinav Bharat, a Hindutva extremist organisation, the fact is that (...)

, by The Hindu

Retooling laws for justice

Many Indian laws do not reflect modern and enlightened concepts of justice and require major revision. The judiciary needs to reconsider laws, which conflict with fundamental rights guaranteed in the Constitution. The legislatures should fashion enlightened statutes for the 21st century. India (...)

, by Al jazeera

The shaping of a New World Order

By Mark LeVine

If the revolutions of 2011 succeed, they will force the creation of a very different regional and world system.
I remember the images well, even though I was too young to understand their political significance. But they were visceral, those photos in the New York Times from Tehran in the (...)

, by Al jazeera

Inception: Dreams of revolution

by Larbi Sadiki

The idea of democratisation planted in Egyptian minds is beyond containment, yet Mubarak continues to resist.
The realist terminology of the ’domino effect’ does not capture the agency that Arabs are today assuming to unseat Arab hegemons, from Cairo to Sana’a.
This agency is unshackling itself (...)

A doctor to defend

By Minnie Vaid, edited by Rajpal and Sons, 5.5 euros

A chilling story of justice denied…
Binayak Sen graduated from one of India’s elite institutions, the Christian Medical College, Vellore, and chose to practice medicine amongst the tribals of Chattisgarh. Years of dedicated work led him to believe that sustainable health care cannot be achieved (...)