Tous les articles et traductions

, by In These Times

The New ‘Lost Generation’: Young Workers

A devastating new report, "The Kids Aren’t All Right," released by the Economic Policy Institute underscores the plight facing young workers in the US—and how little is being done to address the long-term damage this recession has inflicted on a generation of workers. Read (...)

, by Foreign Policy in Focus

The New Anti-Nuclear Movement

There is a lot of news about nuclearism these days. But to cut through the verbiage of treaties and agreements and summits, and move people from fear to action, we need to focus on three concepts. The United States is the biggest problem when it comes to nuclear weapons. We need a new treaty to (...)

, by Down to earth

Carriage of convenience

Metro projects can ease congestion. But lack of integrated planning is undoing the benefits of this mass transport system. Nidhi Jamwal and Ankur Paliwal report. Read more

, by New York Times

Big Banks Draw Profits From Microloans to Poor

In recent years, the idea of giving small loans to poor people became the darling of the development world, hailed as the long elusive formula to propel even the most destitute into better lives. But the phenomenon has grown so popular that some of its biggest proponents are now wringing their (...)

, by The Guardian

The ’Obama doctrine’: kill, don’t detain

The ambitious desire to close Guantánamo hailed the coming of a new era, a feeling implicitly recognised by the Nobel peace prize that President Obama received. Unfortunately, what we witnessed was a false dawn. The lawyers for the Guantánamo detainees with whom I am in touch in the US speak of (...)

, by Frontline

Stunted India

India has the largest number of stunted, wasted and underweight children in the world. Under-nutrition, as a “silent” emergency, haunts the lives of millions of Indian children. Several facts reveal the magnitude and severity of the nutritional crisis facing the country. Close to two million (...)

, by OpenDemocracy

Beyond “liddism”: towards real global security

The first decade of the 21st century has been dominated by wars that have killed or injured close to half a million people, wars that arose after determined paramilitaries used parcel-knives to exploit the weaknesses of the world’s most advanced state. That incident might in principle have been (...)

, by KURLANTZICK Joshua, London Review of Books

Thailand: Red v. Yellow

In recent decades, Thailand has been running one of the world’s most successful national marketing campaigns. Building on its reputation for hospitality, beautiful beaches and splendid food, the tourism ministry has created an image of Thailand as an exotic paradise where travellers are ushered (...)

, by FIAN

Kenya’s Hunger Crisis - the Result of Right to Food Violations

Kenya suffers from recurring drought. The situation during the past three years, however, has reached levels unparalleled in living memory.
"Kenya’s Hunger Crisis - the Result of Right to Food Violations" is the title of a report launched today by FIAN International and RAPDA. These words also (...)

, by Foreign Policy in Focus

The Political Economy of Earthquakes

The survivors of the devastating earthquakes in Haiti and Chile are still scrambling to deal with the damage. Here, however, pundits are still scrambling to explain the dramatic difference in impact. Haiti’s quake on January 12 came in at 7.0 on the Richter scale, leveled the capital city, and (...)

, by Tomdispatch.com

Afghanistan as a Drug War

Since Afghanistan now grows the opium poppies that provide more than 90% of the world’s opium, the raw material for the production of heroin, it’s not surprising that drug-trade news and war news intersect from time to time. More surprising is how seldom poppy growing and the drug trade are (...)

Globalization Marches On

Growing popular outrage has not challenged corporate power

Shifts in global power, ongoing or potential, are a lively topic among policy makers and observers. One question is whether (or when) China will displace the United States as the dominant global player, perhaps along with India.
There is yet another significant shift in global power: from the (...)

South Africa: Progressive constitution, conservative country

As much as those who identify themselves as social progressives would like to believe otherwise, writes Dale McKinley, ‘the reality is that South Africa is a bastion of social conservatism’. One of the most glaring contradictions of South Africa’s post-apartheid ‘transition’, says McKinley, ‘is (...)

, by ALI Tariq, London Review of Books

Unhappy Yemen

In the London Review of Books, Tariq Ali tells about his recent trip to Yemen, after Obama and other US politicians started hinting that this country might become a new frontline yet in the ’war on terror’.
Recounting the country’s history since World War II, and in particular the war and (...)

, by Common Dreams

We Cannot ’Techno-Fix’ Our Way to a Sustainable Future

This week, California will host the Asilomar International Conference on Climate Intervention Technologies. The conference follows hearings last week in the US House of Representatives and a report from the UK Committee on Science and Technology, as well as a recent report from the Government (...)

Trade Unions in Iran: the Other Movement

When most people think about the recent upheavals in Iran, they think of marches demanding democracy and challenging the June 12 presidential election. The face of those protests is the “Green Movement” — so called because its supporters wear green —that put millions of people into the streets of (...)

World’s biggest cities merging into ’mega-regions’

UN-HABITAT launched its report State of the World Cities 2010/2011: Bridging the Urban Divide in the run up to the World Urban Forum 5 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
The world’s mega-cities are merging to form vast "mega-regions" which may stretch hundreds of kilometres across countries and be home (...)