Tous les articles et traductions

, by CIP Americas Program

“Bilateralizing” Relations between Peru and Venezuela

By Ariela Ruiz Caro

After President Ollanta Humala’s state visit to Venezuela Jan 7, and despite some adverse reactions to the visit in Peru, Humala announced that the two countries have “succeeded in turning away from the bilateral politics of the past in which nothing major had been accomplished in diplomatic, (…)

, by LINKS

Washington threatens reprisals against Nicaragua’s voters

John Riddell interviews Felipe Stuart Cournoyer
In a fit of petulant anger, the US government lashed out on January 25 against the outcome of Nicaragua’s recent presidential election. To understand the context of the US threats, I talked to Felipe Stuart Cournoyer, a Nicaraguan citizen and (…)

, by The Telegraph

India tells Britain: We don’t want your aid

By Andrew Gilligan

India’s Finance Minister has said that his country “does not require” British aid, describing it as “peanuts”.
Pranab Mukherjee and other Indian ministers tried to terminate Britain’s aid to their booming country last year - but relented after the British begged them to keep taking the money, (…)

, by Frontline

Polio: A war almost won

By R. Ramachandran

India seems to have arrived at the threshold of polio eradication, but should it lower its guard?
ON January 13, India achieved what had only two years ago seemed impossible in the immediate term. The country, which, given the epidemiological data in the new millennium, had come to be regarded (…)

, by Frontline

Climate Change: Uncertain stand

By R. Ramachandran

India fails to extract emission cut commitments from Annex I countries in return for agreeing to the Durban Mandate at the climate talks.
INDIAN negotiators perhaps lost the wood for the trees at the two-week-long 17th Conference of the Parties (COP17) to the United Nations Framework (…)

, by OpenDemocracy

The contest over peace and security in Africa

By Alex de Waal

The dominant interventionist approach to peace and security in Africa by-passes the hard work of creating domestic political consensus and instead imposes models of government favoured by western powers. The emergent African methodology offers a chance to develop locally-rooted solutions too (…)

, by LINKS

Latin America: Summit in Venezuela Opens ’New Phase in History’

By Federico Fuentes

A summit of huge importance was held in Venezuela on December 2-3, 2011. Two hundred years after Latin America’s independence fighters first raised the battle cry for a united Latin America, 33 heads of state from across the region came together to form the Community of Latin American and (…)

, by The Hindu

The Supporters of Democracy Must Welcome Political Islam

By Wadah Khanfar

From Tunisia to Egypt, Islamists are gaining the popular vote. Far from threatening stability, this makes it a real possibility.
Ennahda, the Islamic party in Tunisia, won 41 per cent of the seats of the Tunisian constitutional assembly last month, causing consternation in the West. But (…)

, by OpenDemocracy

The crisis and the change-makers

By Paul Rogers

In the face of the world’s urgent economic and environmental problems, political leadership is failing. But from the ground up, new tools of understanding are emerging to fill the gap and point a way forward.
The world’s financial crisis is deepening, and protests are spreading across the (…)

, by Social Watch

Global Peace Threatened

More than 300 civil society organizations submitted their proposals for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio2012). In its paper, Social Watch remembered that the Earth Summit held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 stated that “the major cause of the continued deterioration of (…)

, by Frontline

Libya recolonised

By Aijaz AHMAD

Libya is the first country that the Euro-American consortium has invaded exclusively on the pretext of human rights violations.
FROM Kabul in October 2001 to Tripoli in October 2011, a decade of unremitting planetary warfare has seen countries devastated and capitals occupied over a vast (…)

, by Common Dreams

Bill Gates (the .001%) Joins the 99% for Robin Hood Tax

By Sarah Anderson

One of the world’s richest and many of the poorest agree on something, but the Obama administration is holding out.
The world’s second-richest man and a group of American nurses on the frontlines of the Occupy Wall Street protests came to the G20 summit in Cannes, France this week to advocate (…)

, by Infochange

Decadal journeys: Debt and despair spur urban growth

By P. Sainath

Census 2011, which reports a higher growth of urban population than rural as millions give up farming, does not record footloose migration, which drives desperate people to search for work in multiple directions with no clear destination. This is a giant drama that we have not even begun to (…)

, by Down to earth

No climate for Cleantech

By Latha Jishnu

Most of the clean energy innovations are with just six rich countries and hardly any technology is coming to developing nations.
What is the outlook for developing countries in getting clean energy technologies transferred to them at a reasonable fee? Will intellectual property rights (IPR) (…)

, by Pambazuka

Death of Gaddafi

By Horace Campbell

Gaddafi’s killing - with all the hallmarks of a ’coordinated assassination’ – marks ’one more episode ion this NATO war in Libya and North Africa’, writes Horace Campbell. The ’remilitarisation of Africa and new deployment of Africom is a new stage of African politics,’ says Campbell.
The news (…)

, by SACSIS

On the Wall Street Occupation

By Richard Pithouse

In The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck’s novel about the Great Depression, Tom Joad, the novel’s central character, a man who has been made poor and who is on the run from the law, tells his mother in the climactic scene that: “I been thinking about us, too, about our people living like pigs and (…)

, by SACSIS

Africa Must Lead: COP 17 Must Deliver Climate Justice to Developing Nations

By Glenn Ashton

Climate change predominantly impacts those who have benefited least from fossil fuelled industrialisation. The poor have less social, economic and political capacity to adapt to climate change than the rich. The arrival of the global climate negotiating lobby on African shores must focus the (…)