Tous les articles et traductions

, by IPS

Native Women Seek Justice at U.N.

The United States is facing international scrutiny for its apparent failure to prosecute criminals who enter indigenous territories to prey on Native women and girls.
Between 60 and 80 percent of violent victimisation of Native American women is perpetrated by non-Natives, says a U.N. expert (...)

, by Indigenous Environmental Network

Royal society report on tar sands ignores traditional knowledge

Indigenous Peoples, Community Members and Allies raise concerns.

The Royal Society of Canada report on the tar sands released today, spurred concern by directly impacted communities and allies today as conclusions were put forward around the impacts of tar sands development within the region.
“With data coming from primarily government and industry sources, (...)

, by Infochange

What is left of the Left?

As long as there is a dominating status quo, marginalisation and violation of human rights, the Left has a role to play globally and in India, says John Samuel. But the new wave of left politics must go beyond party politics — to the building of a more ethically driven leadership, a non-violent (...)

, by Tehelka

Jaitapur nuclear plant still far from being accepted

Lock-ups, prisons and court cases have become an integral part of the lives of Jaitapur’s residents. The scenic village in Maharashtra, which is to be home to the world’s biggest nuclear plant, has virtually turned into a state of dystopia. The people of the five villages that would be affected (...)

, by Al jazeera

A revolution against neoliberalism?

By Walter Armbrust

On February 16th I read a comment was posted on the wall of the Kullina Khalid Saed ("We are all Khaled Said") Facebook page administered by the now very famous Wael Ghonim. By that time it had been there for about 21 hours. The comment referred to a news item reporting that European (...)

, by TNI

Libya and beyond: what’s next for democracy ?

By Phillys Bennis

The Gaddafi regime in Libya seems to believe that if a government crackdown is murderous enough, demonstrations will stop.
In Egypt, the relatively short-lived military crackdown by the hated security agencies and pro-regime thugs actually strengthened the opposition, reminding the millions in (...)

, by Frontline

Scorching the earth

By Praful Bidwai

The Environment Ministry’s clearance of projects such as Posco, Jaitapur and Lavasa will cause havoc in our gravely endangered environment. Even the worst pessimist could not have imagined that the January 31 order of the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) approving the South (...)

, by The Hindu

Barefoot: Promises to keep

By Harsh Mander

Even four years after the Sachar Committee Report revealed that Muslims were one of the most economically backward and socially disadvantaged communities, nothing much has been done to address the development deficits of this community. Read (...)

, by IIED

Climate change: governments should support migration, not fear it

Governments risk adopting policies that increase people’s vulnerability to climate change because of a general prejudice against migration, according to research published today by the International Institute for Environment and Development.
The research, which includes case studies from (...)

, by ALAI

Facebook and Twitter are not a game

By Abdeslam Baraka

Facebook is not a game. It is a means of communication that transcends borders, but does not supplant national or international legality concerning civil liberties and rights of association and expression. Choosing such means to spread one’s message, is and will be useful and effective, if the (...)

, by WALLERSTEIN Immanuel

The World Social Forum, Egypt, and Transformation

The World Social Forum (WSF) is alive and well. It just met in Dakar, Senegal from Feb. 6-11. By unforeseen coincidence, this was the week of the Egyptian people’s successful dethroning of Hosni Mubarak, which finally succeeded just as the WSF was in its closing session. The WSF spent the week (...)

, by Down to earth

Kerala gets cautious

By Savvy Soumya Misra

Plans to ban extremely and moderately hazardous pesticides in cardamom district, Idukki.
Endosulfan poisoning in Kasaragod district has made the Kerala government cautious in its approach to use of pesticides. Agriculture minister M Retnakaran recently announced that the ban on extremely and (...)

Ending the crisis of capitalism or ending capitalism?

Samir Amin, November 2010, £16.95

With his usual verve and sharpness Samir Amin examines the factors that brought about the 2008 financial collapse and explores the systemic crisis of capitalism after two decades of neoliberal globalisation. He lays bare the relationship between dominating oligopolies and the globalisation of (...)

, by Electronic Intifada

Egypt’s revolution and Israel: "Bad for the Jews"

Ilan Pappe

The view from Israel is that if they indeed succeed, the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions are bad, very bad. Educated Arabs — not all of them dressed as "Islamists," quite a few of them speaking perfect English whose wish for democracy is articulated without resorting to "anti-Western" rhetoric (...)

, by IPS

Dams Threaten Aboriginal Tribe

By K. S. Harikrishnan

Over the years, the Kadars, a dwindling aboriginal tribe who live on the borders of the southern Indian states of Kerala and Tamil Nadu, have survived pestilences, extreme exploitation and even mass sterilisations. But a new government plan to build a hydroelectric dam across the Chalakudy (...)

, by SACSIS

First people still come second

By Glenn Ashton

Namibia, Namaqualand and the Namib Desert are all named after the first people who lived in that area, the Nama. Where are the Nama today? The reality is that they have largely become forgotten bit players in a complex world.
The indigenous people of various nations, descended from traditional (...)

, by IPS

Creation of native reserves slowed down under Lula

By Fabíola Ortiz

In Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s eight years as president of Brazil, he signed decrees creating just 88 indigenous reserves, far fewer than his immediate predecessors. That figure comes from the governmental National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) and the Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI), which (...)

, by The New Economics Foundation (nef)

The Great Transition

Creating a new kind of economy is crucial if we want to tackle climate change and avoid the mounting social problems associated with the rise of economic inequality. The Great Transition provides the first comprehensive blueprint for building an economy based on stability, sustainability and (...)

, by FIAN

Alarming pesticide poisoning among flower workers

Shortly before Valentine’s Day, the European campaign “Fair Flowers - for Human Rights” presents a study on the health impacts of pesticides in the Ugandan flower production for the export to Europe. The study was conducted by the campaign’s partner, the Uganda Workers’ Education Association (UWEA). (...)