Tous les articles et traductions

, by SACSIS

Reinventing Africa as a Country

By Liepollo Pheko

Africa is again becoming a “country” in the popular discourse of Western media intent on rebranding the entire continent as the eternal basket case.
Despite North Africa’s Arab Spring (which has inspired a global movement against corrupt and undemocratic leadership) and the birth of Africa’s 54th (...)

, by SACSIS

Semantics of the Slut Walk

By Gillian Schutte

In 2008 hundreds of South African women donned their miniskirts and protested at the taxi rank where a young girl was brutally accosted by taxi drivers and hawkers for wearing a short denim skirt. The men who accosted her allegedly stuck their fingers into her vagina and called her a "slut." (...)

, by The Hindu

The Other Half - Another India, another protest

By Kalpana Sharma

While the farcical drama around Anna Hazare’s protest and arrest has hogged the limelight, Irom Sharmila’s indefinite fast since 2000 to get the Armed Forces Special Powers Act (AFSPA) repealed continues to be ignored by the nation and the media…
A day after Indians ‘celebrated’ Independence Day (...)

, by Frontline

Sudan: A new nation

By John Cherian

South Sudan faces severe challenges; although 99 per cent of the south voted for independence, the people there are far from united.
ON July 9, South Sudan officially joined the international community as an independent nation. Its President, Salva Kiir, in his speech to mark the historic (...)

, by SACSIS

Improving education in South Africa

By Ebrahim-Khalil Hassen

Projects that Start Small, Scale Quickly and Drive Systemic Change
Take your pick in the national education blame game. Your choices would include teachers’ trade unions, an ideological curriculum unsuited to South Africa, the National Treasury because it does not adequately fund schools or (...)

, by OpenDemocracy

Are Western sanctions against Syria an option?

By Islam Qasem

In the final analysis, sanctions are unlikely to produce the desired effect in time. Assad’s killing machine will continue to target civilians, but sanctions will suck the economic and political oxygen out of the regime.
Western countries are at loss about how to pressure Bashar al-Assad to end (...)

, by Common Dreams

San Francisco Bay Area’s BART pulls a Mubarak

By Amy Goodman

What does the police killing of a homeless man in San Francisco have to do with the Arab Spring uprisings from Tunisia to Syria? The attempt to suppress the protests that followed. In our digitally networked world, the ability to communicate is increasingly viewed as a basic right. Open (...)

, by Open Society Foundations

When patent law stands in the way of saving lives

By Brett Davidson and Els Torreele

A New York Times column from early July provided an unusual if cynical insight into the “a la carte” corporate lobby influence on American legislation. While the United States is among the world’s strongest proponents of ever-increasing intellectual property protections and their worldwide (...)

, by SACSIS

The turn of the Fascist

By Jane Duncan

Jacob Zuma’s rise to power has unleashed a torrent of rash, boorish, misogynistic and inciteful speech from politicians and commentators. In this regard, the utterances of ANC Youth League’s Julius Malema and ex-columnist Eric Miyeni come to mind. Why has public discourse plumbed to such depths (...)

, by AlterNet

Do we need a militant movement to save the planet (and ourselves)?

Derrick Jensen, Lierre Keith and Aric McBay call for new strategy to stave off environmental catastrophe.
Environmental groups are trying to build a critical mass around issues like global warming to inspire public action and encourage legislators to get their heads out of the sand. The Sierra (...)

, by SACSIS

The return of the English riot

By Richard Pithouse

The riot has been a feature of English life for a lot longer than William Shakespeare, village cricket matches or, for that matter, The Clash. The English have rioted against the enclosure of common land, fences, press gangs, factories, prisons, bread prices, tolls and banks. Arson, tearing (...)

, by Chinadialogue

Kenya’s biofuel evictions

By Tracy McVeigh

In the Tana Delta’s unique wetlands, villagers fight for their plots of land as the government forces them out — to make way for water-thirsty sugar-cane and jatropha plantations.
Gamba Manyatta village is empty now, weeds already roping around the few skeletal hut frames still standing. The (...)