Tous les articles et traductions

Slow Finance

Why Investment Miles Matter

By Gervais Williams, Bloomsbury Publishing, 208 pages
Gervais Williams explains why investment miles matter. His new book Slow Finance anticipates a forthcoming change in public attitude to the financial sector. Just as the Slow Food movement represents a reaction to the food industry losing (...)

, by SACSIS

The Struggle for Street Politics

By Jane Duncan

Public demonstrations have been central to South Africa’s democratic life for decades. Yet recent events suggest a narrowing of the substance of the right to assemble, demonstrate and picket, and a de-legitimisation of street politics. In this regard, the City of Cape Town’s near hysterical (...)

, by LINKS

Washington threatens reprisals against Nicaragua’s voters

John Riddell interviews Felipe Stuart Cournoyer
In a fit of petulant anger, the US government lashed out on January 25 against the outcome of Nicaragua’s recent presidential election. To understand the context of the US threats, I talked to Felipe Stuart Cournoyer, a Nicaraguan citizen and (...)

, by Himal Southasian

Burma: Halt in hostilities?

By Larry Jagan

Burma edges towards peace.
Hopes of an end to the world’s longest-running insurgency were raised in recent days, as several ethnic rebel groups entered into ceasefire agreements with the Burmese government. The most important of these took place on 12 January, when the Karen National Union (...)

, by The Hindu

From food security to food justice

By Ananya Mukherjee

A quarter of a million women in Kerala are showing us how to earn livelihoods with dignity.
If the malnourished in India formed a country, it would be the world’s fifth largest — almost the size of Indonesia. According to Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), 237.7 million Indians are (...)

, by Down to earth

Jarawas: to protect or not

By Kumar Sambhav Shrivastava

Government’s expert panel against bringing the tribe into the mainstream
A RECENTLY released video showing Jarawa women dancing in front of tourists has triggered a debate on whether the ancient tribe of Andaman and Nicobar Islands should be brought into the mainstream. In this context, an (...)

, by Social Watch

Feminist economics demands a new development paradigm

Gender equity is a key element of any genuine program towards sustainable development. Analysis included on the Social Watch Report 2012 and the national contributions to the study prove, once again, the stagnation of the fight against these disparities, with disastrous consequences on the (...)

, by Pambazuka

To Cook a Continent

Destructive Extraction and the Climate Crisis in Africa

By Nnimmo Bassey,, Pambazuka Press, £14.95
People in Africa argue that natural resources are a blessing; it is the way these are plundered and used that can turn them into a curse. The continent has plenty of experience of such plunder. Rich in resources, Africa is a net supplier of energy and (...)

, by SACSIS

Adding Insult to Injury: The Impacts of Coal Extraction

By Glenn Ashton

Significant developments in the energy sector are underway in western Limpopo because of the extensive coal resources in that region. Besides Eskom’s massive Medupi power station, near the existing Matimba power station, there are several other mega-projects in the pipeline. The question is (...)

, by SACSIS

Press Self-regulation: Dead or Alive?

By Jane Duncan

In the next few weeks, the Press Freedom Commission will be holding public hearings into the adequacy of the self regulatory system for the press. In terms of this system, complaints of unethical reporting are handled by the Press Council of South Africa (PCSA), which was set up and is run by (...)

, by Access Now

Internet’s future uncertain in post-war Iraq

In the aftermath of the 2003 US invasion, Iraq has struggled to rebuild infrastructure critical to providing citizens basic tools for economic, political, and social justice and prosperity.
Among the government’s main initiatives is increasing access to the internet and other channels of (...)

, by OpenDemocracy

The world’s first Muslim human rights commission

By Marie Juul Petersen

The Independent Permanent Human Rights Commission heralds an expansion of dialogue about human rights abuses in member states. Could a Muslim human rights commission also revitalize the image of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation?
In June 2011, 57 foreign ministers met in Kazakhstan to (...)

, by Global Voices

Latin America, 2011: A Year Marked by Social Movements

As the Arab Spring unfolded throughout 2011, and as Spain’s indignados and the now worldwide ‘Occupy’ movement gained momentum, important social movements also rose up across Central and South America.
In 2011, Latin Americans took to the streets in big cities and small towns to defend their (...)